Introducing Wheat Sensitivity and the Wheat Zoomer El Paso, Texas

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Today local chiropractors will be giving a description of the wheat zoomer. We will be giving a brief description of each panel, its markers, and the basic interpretations of the test. We will also be discussing the considerations for the patients and providers before we take The Wheat Zoomer test.

What is a Wheat Zoomer test?

The Vibrant wheat zoomer has 6 test in one to identify if the patient has wheat and gluten sensitivity. The Vibrant wheat zoomer does give our patients a thorough evaluation and we ask our patients if they started to be gluten-free or was gluten-free, either from birth or not and how much gluten-contained food did they eat. One of the best ways to ensure that our patients may have a gluten sensitivity is that if they have a food diary for us to look over and that way we can determine how severe of the wheat zoomer.

IgA vs. IgG

For us to know about the wheat zoomer in our patient’s body, we must understand the immunoglobulins. The first one is IgA. IgA immunoglobulins are mucosal and are found primarily in the epithelial lining of the body: intestinal tract, lungs esophagus, blood-brain barrier and around internal organs. They are:

  • The first line of defense.
  • More accurate to our gut.

IgG immunoglobulins found in the blood system and are numerous in the body They are considered ‘systemic’ and are non-specific to any one location. Not all IgG antibodies are sensitive though, some of them can indicate that an antigen has ‘leaked’ into the blood and the immune system tagged that antigen as a ‘non-self.’ And they are not diagnostic as IgG+IgA, but if IgA is absent, the antibodies are more relevant.

  • If the patient is recently gluten-free, the antibodies will tell us that the antigen hasn’t cleared out in the patient’s system from past weeks of eating gluten.

Celiac

Celiac is a growing autoimmune disease, about 1% of the population is affective and 1 in 7 Americans have a reaction to wheat or wheat gluten disorder. The Vibrant test can determine a 99% sensitivity and 100% specify on the celiac antibodies.

  • Total IgA and Total IgG measure both the IgA and IgG to determine the patient’s reactivity to gluten
  • Cut off for IgA is 160 as well as a bottom 1/3rd
  • Not all traditional markers for celiac disease doesn’t need to be elevated if tTg2 is elevated.

Intestinal Permeability

Zonulin is the gatekeeper for the intestines and controls nutrient flows and molecules across the membrane. It is a protein complex inside the intestinal tight junctions and can be increased by either gluten and high-fat meals.

Anti-Actin, especially f-Actin, is in the smooth muscle of the intestines. Actin is part of the actomyosin complex. Vibrant can isolate f-Actin to get a more accurate picture of the patient’s immune response to the guts. While antibodies in actin can identify intestinal destruction and indicate autoimmune diseases like connective tissue disease and autoimmune hepatitis.

Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is produced by gram-negative enterobacteria. It is very potent and can cause inflammation. Plus it’s one of the indications of a leaky gut. Practitioners can draw additional lab test for cardiovascular, inflammatory markers, and diabetes/insulin resistance.

Dr. Jimenez suggests to our patients to try a Vibrant GutZoomer to identify the source of their ailments.

Gluten-medicated Autoimmunity

Fusion Peptide was the new addition to Wheat Zoomer in 2017. It is cross-linked to tTg and can identified celiac progression from 14 months to 4 years.

Differential Transglutaminases can detect autoimmune reactions to gluten that are not celiac or are becoming celiac. However, gluten is still a trigger but react differently in the autoimmune celiac disease such as:

  • Transglutaminase 3= skin manifestations of autoimmunity like dermatitis herpetiformis, eczema, and psoriasis.
  • Transglutaminases 6= neurological manifestations of autoimmunity in the cerebellum like gluten ataxia, gate abnormalities, balance and coordination issues.

Wheat Germ Agglutinin

Wheat Germ Agglutinin is the lectin component of wheat, but, it is not a component of gluten. Dr. Jimenez can detect a patient’s low level of Vitamin D absorption from the patient’s results. And Wheat Germ Agglutinin is commonly used as an additive in supplements and the supplement can still be called gluten-free due to the different protein structure.

Gliadin, Gluteomorphin, and Prodynorphin

Gliadin and glutenin are what makes up the super protein in gluten. Most people are reacting to the Gliadin portion of gluten and gliadin binds with tTg2 in celiac and binds zonulin to a leaky gut in patients. Gliadin reacts to any antigens can indicate a sensitivity to gluten in patients and gluteomorphin are peptides in wheat and respond as a euphoria receptor to the brain. Prodynorphins antibodies can show that gluten reacts to signaling hormones and affect the patient’s mood.

Sadly though, patients do have a hard time withdrawing gluten in their diet since their antibodies are used to the compound and it up to us, here at Injury Medical Clinic to gently push our patients to have the will power to fix what is causing them to have ailments.

Wheat Allergen

Wheat Allergen is the actual allergen body. Some patients that already know that they are allergic to wheat from a young age but it doesn’t decrease when wheat is eliminated and can remain long term after the allergic response happens.

Glutenin

Glutenin is the other part of the gluten compound. However, it is less common to some people, but some individuals do show reactivity to glutenin, thus still have a gluten sensitivity. But there is no clinical difference to the responsiveness to glutenin from high to low molecular weight.

Non-Gluten Wheat Proteins

Surprisingly Vibrant has an advantage to their test as they have a panel for patients that don’t have a gluten sensitivity but a wheat sensitivity. The Vibrant advantage to the unique non-gluten wheat panel shows us that:

  • Proteins in wheat unrelated to gluten but relevant to immune reactions.
  • It is 30% of the molecular protein weight of wheat.
  • Some individuals are more reactive to wheat proteins than gluten itself.

If they are trying to be gluten-free, patients still have to read the labels to see if any hidden wheat starches are in the ingredients. But not all food products are gluten-free if they have the wheat protein in them.

Conclusion

If the patient is trying to be gluten-free but previously ate gluten compound food. They can still feel the reaction if they discovered that they have a sensitivity to gluten by their practitioner. And must take precautions when they are reading the labels of the products they are going to buy and consume. In the next four articles, we will discuss what the Wheat Zoomer can provide as well as, talking about what causes leaky gut, what actually goes on in our patient’s intestines, and wrapping up on what to do after the Wheat Zoomer heals and restores the gut barrier.

 

Post Disclaimer

Professional Scope of Practice *

The information herein on "Introducing Wheat Sensitivity and the Wheat Zoomer El Paso, Texas" is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional.

Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system.

Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.*

Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

We are here to help you and your family.

Blessings

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACP, CCST, IFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

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