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Everyone has their own set of genes. These genes determine certain characteristics and traits that set us apart from others. Genes are inherited or influenced by environmental factors. The genes that are inherited are more obvious ones, such as eye color, height, and hair color. However, there are genes that are not so obvious, including factors like your chances of disease or asthma. Additionally, there are genes that are stimulated by the environment we are brought up in. These genes correlate to factors like the music we like to listen to and the language we speak. 

A Break Down

Genes are comprised of DNA. DNA builds everything that is made, an individual or a plant, DNA is responsible. There are 4 main building blocks that comprise DNA, A, C, T, and G. The order in which these chemical bases connect is what builds our unique genetic factors. A will always pair with T just like C will pair with G. After connected, these bases come together to build larger strands known as genes. A large set of genes is referred to as a genome. A genome creates an organism. Every person has the same genes arranged in the same order, but the small differences including the sequence of these genes is what makes us different from each other. 

The Importance of Protein

Proteins are nick-named the building blocks of life. Proteins are large complex molecules found in every hair on your head down to your toes and everything in between. In total, there are 20 amino acids that create proteins. By putting these 20 different amino acids together in different combinations proteins are able to form and create many different shapes. These shapes determine what the function of the protein is and what it is capable of. 

Mutations in our genes are common and usually do not possess a threat. However, when the mutation occurs in the genes that produce proteins, this is where the problems arise. 

Actually, the differences in our genes come through mutations. When a cell is copying its DNA, an extra-base is added or a base is left out. In fact, each individual has 60 new variations that our parents do not. 

When humans reproduce, DNA is passed through generations to the offspring. Each offspring obtains equal amounts of DNA from each parent, but varying to each sibling. Individuals have two copies of every gene and we pass down one. 

Chromosomes

Each individual has 46 chromosomes, 23 from each parent. Reading chromosomes provides researchers with specific information. One way to read chromosomes is by their size. Second is their pattern. The size and the location of the Giemsa bands vary from each individual making them unique. The third is the positioning of the centromere. Centromeres are important as they play a key part when the chromosomes separate. 

Labs

23andme is an affordable test will show you your health and the chances you have of getting certain diseases. 

Genes are advanced and scientists are still uncovering new information about them every year. We are now seeing the importance of genes and the role they play in nutrigenomics and the bigger picture.  -Kenna Vaughn, Senior Health Coach 

References:

Translational Nutrigenomics, Mauka. “Module 1.” 2020, ctgeducation. talentlms.com/unit/view/id:1830.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900

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Professional Scope of Practice *

The information herein on "Genes: What Are They?" is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional.

Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system.

Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.*

Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

We are here to help you and your family.

Blessings

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACP, CCST, IFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

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