Fitness

Vibration Exercise: Innovative Workout

Share

For years, companies have been hawking vibration as a form of exercise—from those fat-jiggling waist belts in the ’80s to the vibrating platforms found in many gyms today. Now, a new study in mice suggests there might be some truth to the idea that a vibrating machine may be able to deliver some of the same benefits as actual physical activity.

The new research, published in the journal Endocrinology, found that mice with diabetes and obesity had similar improvements in muscle mass and insulin sensitivity over 12 weeks when they were assigned to either 45 minutes of daily treadmill walking or 20 minutes of daily whole-body vibration. Both groups gained less weight and improved more in overall health than sedentary mice that received neither intervention.

How Vibration Exercise Works

Whole-body vibration consists of a person (or, in the study’s case, a mouse) sitting, standing or lying on a platform. The platform’s vibrations send tiny shockwaves through the body, causing muscles to contract and relax multiple times per second.

The obese mice in the study also had low bone density, a common side effect of excess weight in both animals and humans. While treadmill exercise did improve this measure over 12 weeks, the vibration technique did not. Both interventions did, however, increase levels of a protein involved in bone formation, suggesting that longer-term treatments could potentially help prevent future bone loss.

Vibration is not a cure-all for the problems associated with sedentary life, say the study authors, and results seen in mice don’t necessarily translate to humans. Before vibration-based treatments can be widely recommended, these results would need to be replicated in clinical trials. (A 2009 study found that vibration platforms helped obese people lose body fat, but other metabolic benefits have been less studied in people.)

RELATED: Sculpt Your Legs and Butt With Gigi Hadid’s Favorite Exercise

The authors also point out that the study was designed to test the benefits of vibration on obese, unhealthy mice for whom regular exercise is difficult. Young, healthy mice, who were also included in the study, did not reap the same benefits from the whole-body vibration.

Lead author Meghan McGee-Lawrence, assistant professor of cellular biology and anatomy at Augusta University, says that vibration therapy might be an effective way to help people who are extremely overweight or have other limitations that keep them from regular physical activity.

“If you are able to exercise, we’d still recommend exercise as a first choice option,” says McGee-Lawrence. But for people who find it difficult to work out in a traditional way, “our study suggests it may be possible to obtain some of the same beneficial effects of exercise in a different, less strenuous way.”

For vibration to have these benefits, though, a lot of things have to be just right. “The frequency and magnitude of the stimulus, and how long it’s applied, need to be optimized to achieve the outcome you desire,” says McGee-Lawrence. It is possible to have too much of a good thing, she adds. Exposure to higher-level vibration in occupational settings, for example, can actually have a harmful effect on bone.

Pete McCall, an exercise physiologist with the American Council on Exercise, says that benefits of whole-body vibration are “100% legit.” Vibration platforms can be used for exercise warm-ups, cool-downs or for certain moves like squats, planks and Pilates poses.

“When you’re on one of these platforms, the oscillations add gravity and force, which are really important for building strength,” he says. For people who are too overweight or too out of shape to exercise safely and comfortably, he adds, vibration training can “introduce exercise to the body in a relatively low-stress environment.”

“Standing on a vibrating platform for 5, 10, 15 minutes can actually make cells stronger, maybe help them lose a little weight, and get them better prepared to eventually start exercising,” he says.

The American Council on Exercise warns that whole-body vibration machines may affect pacemakers and other electronic implants, and that pregnant women and anyone with a history of seizures, tumors or thrombosis should not use them.

For generally healthy people, McCall stresses that they should be used as a supplement to moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, not a replacement. “There’s no additional demand for oxygen, so the lungs and heart don’t have to work any harder,” he points out. “It’s not going to give you the important cardiovascular benefits that real exercise will.”

For more information, please feel free to ask Dr. Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .

Whole Body Wellness

Overall health and wellness can be achieved by following a proper nutrition and engaging in regular exercise and/or physical activities. While these are some of the most common ways to ensure whole body health and wellness, visiting a qualified and experienced healthcare professional can also grant your body additional benefits. Chiropractic care, for instance, is a safe and effective alternative treatment option utilized by people to maintain well-being.

.video-containerposition: relative; padding-bottom: 63%; padding-top: 35px; height: 0; overflow: hidden;.video-container iframeposition: absolute; top:0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; border: none; max-width:100%;

 

TRENDING TOPIC: EXTRA EXTRA: New PUSH 24/7®? Fitness Center

 

 

Post Disclaimer

Professional Scope of Practice *

The information herein on "Vibration Exercise: Innovative Workout" is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional.

Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system.

Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.*

Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

We are here to help you and your family.

Blessings

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACP, CCST, IFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

Recent Posts

Personalized Training & Rehabilitation! | El Paso, TX (2021)

https://youtu.be/XVNV5-UUufk On today’s podcast Dr. Jimenez DC, health coaches Adriana Caceres and Faith Arciniaga will… Read More

October 19, 2021

Acute and Chronic Sports Injuries

Acute and chronic sports injuries. Individuals that participate in sports or physical activities have an… Read More

October 18, 2021

Low Laser Therapy Benefits for Ruptured Achilles Tendon | El Paso, TX

One of the most common tendons in the body that gets injured is the Achilles… Read More

October 18, 2021

Blood Pressure and Gut Microbiota: What we know.

The connection between our modifiable life factors and the risk of developing diseases has been… Read More

October 18, 2021

Carpal Tunnel Prevention

Today, we are constantly tapping, scrolling, clicking, using our hands, fingers, and thumbs on smartphones,… Read More

October 15, 2021

CBD, THC & HEMP? What is the difference? | El Paso, TX (2021)

https://youtu.be/sOolG4CEBic On today’s podcast Spencer Salas and Dr. Alex Jimenez discuss CBD, TCH, and Hemp.… Read More

October 15, 2021

Personal Injury, Trauma & Spine Rehab. Specialists

Online History & Registration 🔘
Call Us Today 🔘