Nerve Injury

A Pinched Nerve

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Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Alexander Jimenez breaks down how pinched nerves cause back and neck pain.

You hear people say it a lot:

“I have a pinched nerve, and wow, it hurts.”

But what exactly is a pinched nerve? How does it cause back pain or neck pain? What are the symptoms of a pinched nerve—beyond pain? And most importantly, what can you do about a pinched nerve? Learn the basics of pinched nerves here.

Pinched Nerves: A Common Cause of Back & Neck Pain

What Is A Nerve?

 

Nerves are your body’s messengers. They transport signals to and from your brain—messages like “Move this toe” or “Ouch, that cactus needle really is sharp.” You have a central nervous system, which is made up of your brain and spinal cord. You also have a peripheral nervous system, which is the system of nerves that branches off the brain and spinal cord.

What Do Nerves Look Like?

If it helps, think of nerves like a garden hose (except they aren’t green). They have an outside membrane that transports those electrical messages. Inside nerves, there’s a fluid that nourishes and replenishes the outer membrane.

You’re Getting on My Nerves

When a nerve gets pinched, the messages and the nourishing fluid don’t flow quite as well as they should (still helpful to think of a garden hose here). A pinched nerve can start sending the “Ow, pain” message to the brain, and it can also have trouble communicating clear messages, possibly leading to weakness, numbness, or tingling.

What Can Pinch a Nerve?

As a nerve exits the spinal canal, it can be pinched by a herniated disc or a bone spur. Bone spurs, also known as osteophytes, are bony bumps that can develop on a spinal joint over time. They can push into the spinal nerve, as you can see in this illustration (red = pain generator, of course).

What Does a Pinched Nerve Feel Like?

A pinched nerve mostly feels like pain. If you have a pinched nerve in your low back, it can cause pain to travel (or radiate, in doctor-speak) down your leg. You may also know that as sciatica. A pinched nerve in the neck can create pain that shoots down your arm. Other symptoms of pinched nerves include muscle spasms, burning, tingling, and a hot/cold sensation.

Now the Good Stuff: Pinched Nerve Treatments

Pinched nerve treatments fall into two categories: what you can do at home (self-care) and what your doctor may prescribe for you.

Pinched Nerve Self-care #1: Heat and Ice

Heat and ice can work wonders on a pinched nerve. Switch between 20 minutes of heat and 20 minutes of ice—and remember that you shouldn’t put the heat and ice packs directly on your skin.

Pinched Nerve Self-care #2: Get a Massage

The muscles around a pinched nerve can become tight, so having a professional massage therapist work the painful area can bring pain relief. You may also consider a handheld massager.

Pinched Nerve Self-care #3: Take a Walk

Let’s say it’s your low back—a pinched nerve in your low back—that’s hurting you. A nice, easy stroll is a good way to stay active and address your pain. Gone are the days of extended bed rest for back pain: doctors now are more likely to recommend you exercise and stretch to help relieve your pain.

When Should You Call a Doctor?

If you try the self-care thing and yet your pinched nerve pain persists, you should consider calling the doctor. If you’ve been in pain for more than a couple of days, schedule an appointment. You should also call the doctor if you experience a very sudden onset of weakness, or if you experience profound numbness. Losing bowel and/or bladder control is also a good reason to call the doctor.

How a Doctor Treats a Pinched Nerve

The doctor will try to diagnose the cause of your pinched nerve, and then the doctor will be able to develop a treatment plan. That plan may include prescription pain medications, physical therapy, or cortisone injections. But keep this in mind: the treatment plan will be specifically tailored for you, and it’s in your best interest to follow it closely.

 

Post Disclaimer

Professional Scope of Practice *

The information herein on "A Pinched Nerve" is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional.

Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system.

Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.*

Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

We are here to help you and your family.

Blessings

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACP, CCST, IFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

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