Chiropractic

Effective Nonsurgical Treatments for Hip Pain and Plantar Fasciitis

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Can plantar fasciitis patients incorporate non-surgical treatments to reduce hip pain and restore mobility?

Introduction

Everyone is on their feet constantly as it helps people stay mobile and allows them to go from one location to another. Many people are constantly on their feet from childhood to adulthood. This is because the feet are part of the lower musculoskeletal extremities that stabilize the hips and allow sensory-motor function to the legs, thighs, and calves. The feet also have various muscles, tendons, and ligaments surrounding the skeletal structure to prevent pain and discomfort. However, when repetitive motions or injuries start to affect the feet, it can lead to plantar fasciitis and, over time, cause overlapping risk profiles that lead to hip pain. When people are experiencing these pain-like conditions, it can significantly affect their daily activities and overall quality of life. When this happens, many people seek various treatments to reduce the pain-like symptoms caused by plantar fasciitis and restore hip mobility. Today’s article looks at how plantar fasciitis correlates with hip pain, the connection between the feet and the hips, and how there are non-surgical solutions to reduce plantar fasciitis. We talk with certified medical providers who consolidate our patients’ information to assess how to mitigate plantar fasciitis and restore hip mobility. We also inform and guide patients on how numerous non-surgical treatments can help strengthen weak muscles associated with plantar fasciitis and help with restoring stabilization from hip pain. We encourage our patients to ask their associated medical providers intricate and important questions about incorporating small changes to reduce the pain-like effects caused by plantar fasciitis. Dr. Jimenez, D.C., includes this information as an academic service. Disclaimer.

 

How Plantar Fasciitis Correlates With Hip Pain

Do you experience pain in your heels constantly after a long walk? Do you feel stiffness in your hips when stretching? Or do you feel your shoes are causing tension and pain in your feet and calves? Often, many of these pain-like scenarios are due to people dealing with plantar fasciitis, characterized by heel pain due to inflammation or degenerative irritation of the plantar fascia, a band of thick tissues is running across the bottom of the foot and connecting to the heel bone to the toes in the lower extremities. This band of tissues plays an essential role in the body, providing normal biomechanics to the foot while supporting the arch and helping with shock absorption. (Buchanan et al., 2024) Plantar fasciitis can affect the stability of the lower extremities since the pain affects the feet and causes hip pain.

 

 

So, how would plantar fasciitis correlate with hip pain? With plantar fasciitis, many people are experiencing pain in their feet. It can lead to abnormal foot posture, lower extremity muscle weakness, and muscle stress that can reduce the stability of the legs and hip muscles. (Lee et al., 2022) With hip pain, many people can experience a gait dysfunction that causes muscle weakness in the lower extremities and causes the accessory muscles to perform the primary muscles’ jobs. To that point, this forces people to scrap the ground when walking. (Ahuja et al., 2020) This is because normal conditions like natural aging, muscle overuse, or trauma can cause pain-like symptoms to the hips, including discomfort on the thighs, groin, and buttock region, joint stiffness, and reduced range of motion. Hip pain can cause overlapping risk profiles that may include repetitive strain on the feet, thus leading to symptoms of sharp to dull aches on the heel.

 

The Connection Between The Feet and The Hips

It is important to understand that foot problems like plantar fasciitis can affect the hips and vice versa, as both body regions have a beautiful relationship within the musculoskeletal system. Plantar fasciitis on their feet can alter their gait function, potentially leading to hip pain over time. This is due to many environmental factors that can affect the hips and feet over time, leading to plantar fasciitis correlating with hip pain. From excessive weight-bearing activities to microtrauma in the hips or the plantar fascia, many people will often seek treatment to reduce the effects of plantar fasciitis correlated with hip pain by addressing how their range of motion is affecting the plantarflexion and their load on the force-absorbing plantar surface structures could be good starting points in the prevention and treatment of plantar fasciitis correlated with hip pain. (Hamstra-Wright et al., 2021)

 


What Is Plantar Fasciitis?-Video


Non-Surgical Solutions To Reduce Plantar Fasciitis

When it comes to reducing plantar fasciitis in the body, many individuals will seek non-surgical treatments that can alleviate the pain from plantar fascia. Non-surgical treatments are cost-effective and can reduce the pain from plantar fasciitis and its associated symptoms, like hip pain. Some of the benefits of non-surgical treatments are promising, as they have a low risk of complications, good accessibility, and even a high capacity to relieve the mechanical load on the plantar fascia when doing regular activities. (Schuitema et al., 2020) Some of the non-surgical treatments that many people can incorporate include:

  • Stretching exercises
  • Orthotic devices
  • Chiropractic care
  • Massage therapy
  • Acupuncture/electroacupuncture
  • Spinal decompression

 

These non-surgical treatments not only help reduce plantar fasciitis but also help alleviate hip pain. For example, spinal decompression can help restore hip mobility by stretching the lumbar spine and relieving the lower extremities from numbness while strengthening tight muscles. (Takagi et al., 2023). Electroacupuncture can stimulate the body’s acupoints to release endorphins from the lower extremities to reduce inflammation of the plantar fascia. (Wang et al., 2019) When people begin to make small changes in their routine, like wearing proper footwear and not carrying or lifting heavy weighted objects, it can go a long way to prevent plantar fasciitis and hip pain from reoccurring can go a long way. Having a personalized treatment plan can ensure many individuals seeking non-surgical treatments have a better outcome on their health and mobility while preventing long-term complications. 

 


References

Ahuja, V., Thapa, D., Patial, S., Chander, A., & Ahuja, A. (2020). Chronic hip pain in adults: Current knowledge and future prospective. J Anaesthesiol Clin Pharmacol, 36(4), 450-457. doi.org/10.4103/joacp.JOACP_170_19

Buchanan, B. K., Sina, R. E., & Kushner, D. (2024). Plantar Fasciitis. In StatPearls. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28613727

Hamstra-Wright, K. L., Huxel Bliven, K. C., Bay, R. C., & Aydemir, B. (2021). Risk Factors for Plantar Fasciitis in Physically Active Individuals: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Sports Health, 13(3), 296-303. doi.org/10.1177/1941738120970976

Lee, J. H., Shin, K. H., Jung, T. S., & Jang, W. Y. (2022). Lower Extremity Muscle Performance and Foot Pressure in Patients Who Have Plantar Fasciitis with and without Flat Foot Posture. Int J Environ Res Public Health, 20(1). doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20010087

Schuitema, D., Greve, C., Postema, K., Dekker, R., & Hijmans, J. M. (2020). Effectiveness of Mechanical Treatment for Plantar Fasciitis: A Systematic Review. J Sport Rehabil, 29(5), 657-674. doi.org/10.1123/jsr.2019-0036

Takagi, Y., Yamada, H., Ebara, H., Hayashi, H., Inatani, H., Toyooka, K., Mori, A., Kitano, Y., Nakanami, A., Kagechika, K., Yahata, T., & Tsuchiya, H. (2023). Decompression for lumbar spinal stenosis at the intrathecal catheter insertion site during intrathecal baclofen therapy: a case report. J Med Case Rep, 17(1), 239. doi.org/10.1186/s13256-023-03959-1

Wang, W., Liu, Y., Zhao, J., Jiao, R., & Liu, Z. (2019). Electroacupuncture versus manual acupuncture in the treatment of plantar heel pain syndrome: study protocol for an upcoming randomised controlled trial. BMJ Open, 9(4), e026147. doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2018-026147

Disclaimer

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Professional Scope of Practice *

The information herein on "Effective Nonsurgical Treatments for Hip Pain and Plantar Fasciitis" is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional or licensed physician and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional.

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Our information scope is limited to Chiropractic, musculoskeletal, acupuncture, physical medicines, wellness, contributing etiological viscerosomatic disturbances within clinical presentations, associated somatovisceral reflex clinical dynamics, subluxation complexes, sensitive health issues, and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions.

We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from various disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system.

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Our office has reasonably attempted to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez, DC, or contact us at 915-850-0900.

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Blessings

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACP, RN*, CCST, IFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed as a Doctor of Chiropractic (DC) in Texas & New Mexico*
Texas DC License # TX5807, New Mexico DC License # NM-DC2182

Licensed as a Registered Nurse (RN*) in Florida
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Compact Status: Multi-State License: Authorized to Practice in 40 States*

Presently Matriculated: ICHS: MSN* FNP (Family Nurse Practitioner Program)

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACP, RN* CIFM*, IFMCP*, ATN*, CCST
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