Build A Healthy Meal That Actually Keeps You Full

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Do you ever eat a healthy lunch only to find yourself starving by 3 p.m.? You’re not alone. This a common frustration I hear from my clients, and in most cases, the explanation is the same: The meal was missing at least one key element that plays a major role in satiety, satisfaction, and energy. Luckily there’s an easy fix: Use my simple formula for crafting meals that stave off hunger—but don’t leave you feeling over-stuffed or sluggish. I’ve also included five simple examples that fit the bill below.

1. Add fiber-rich veggies

I highly recommend working veggies into every meal (even breakfast!). They’re nutritious, full of antioxidants, provide very few calories per portion, and are packed with fiber—which is filling because it takes up space in your digestive system. Fiber also slows digestion, which means you’ll have a steadier supply of energy over a longer period of time.

For breakfast, veggies can be added to an omelet, whipped into a smoothie, or eaten as a side. Many of my clients even enjoy salad at breakfast (dressed with citrus vinaigrette), or a serving of raw veggies that act as a palate cleanser at the end of the meal. All veggies provide some fiber, but a few top sources include artichokes, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, and kale.

 

RELATED: What is Clean Eating?

2. Choose lean protein

Aside from boosting metabolism, lean protein also wards off hunger better than carbs and fat, according to research. Be sure to include a lean source (think eggs, seafood, poultry, or Greek yogurt) in each meal. If you’re vegan, reach for pulses—the umbrella term for lentils, beans, and peas, like chickpeas and black eyed peas.

3. Don’t forget a plant-based fat

There’s no doubt about it: Fat is satiating. If you’ve ever eaten a salad with fat-free dressing versus one with olive oil, you’ve experienced the difference. Plus, the notion that eating fat makes you fat is seriously outdated. I tell my clients to include a healthy source in every meal. My favorites are avocados, nuts and seed (including ground-up versions like almond butter and tahini), extra virgin olive oil, Mediterranean olives, olive tapenade, and pestos made with EVOO and nuts or seeds.

 

RELATED: 13 Healthy High-Fat Foods You Should Eat More

4. Toss in a “good” carb

By now you probably know that eating a low-fat blueberry muffin for breakfast isn’t exactly good for you. But did you realize it will likely leave your stomach grumbling an hour later despite the whopping 400 calorie count? That’s because refined carbs and sugar cause a spurge in blood glucose that triggers a quick insulin response; the insulin spike then results in a drop in blood sugar, which means the return of hunger pangs.

But, that doesn’t mean you need to nix carbs altogether. Just opt for a small portion of a fiber-packed, whole food source. Good choices include whole grains like oats or quinoa, starchy veggies like skin-on potatoes and squash, fresh fruit, and pulses.

Start with a small serving—around half a cup (or the size of half a tennis ball)—and up your intake depending on your body’s fuel needs. In other words, if you spend most of your hours sitting at a desk, a half cup is probably fine. But if you have an active day ahead, bump up the carbs a bit.

5. Be generous with herbs and spices

Natural herbs and spices are another category of satiety enhancers. I’m talking fresh or dried basil, cilantro, oregano, rosemary, garlic, ginger, cinnamon, turmeric, cumin, zest, and pepper. Even vinegars like balsamic, and hot peppers like chili or jalapeno, count. Use them to add aroma and flavor, and raise your satisfaction level at each meal.

 

RELATED: You Should Probably Be Eating More Turmeric. Here’s How

 

Now you may be wondering what a “complete” meal that follows all five rules would actually look like. If so, here are five examples of easy, stick-to-your-ribs, energizing dishes:

Veggie scramble

Sauté Brussels sprouts in low-sodium vegetable broth, along with more of your favorite veggies like onion and grape tomatoes, along with seasonings, such as a dried Italian herb mix, turmeric, and black pepper. Add one whole egg and three to four whites or one whole egg and three quarters cup whites to scramble. Serve over a half-cup of lentils, topped with half of a sliced avocado.

Turkey veggie stir-fry

Brown about four ounces of extra-lean ground turkey and set aside. Sauté broccoli florets and other veggie faves like bell pepper and mushrooms in low-sodium vegetable broth with minced garlic, fresh grated ginger, and minced chili pepper. Add the turkey back in to re-heat, serve over a small scoop of brown or wild rice, and top with sliced almonds.

Wild tuna salad

Mix canned wild tuna with herbed olive tapenade. Serve over a bed of greens and veggies, topped with cooked, chilled quinoa.

 

RELATED: How to Buy Healthy Food Without Looking at the Nutrition Label

Chilled egg salad

Toss a handful of minced kale with a chopped hard boiled egg and three whites. Fold in a tablespoon of dairy-free pesto and mix with a half cup of chickpeas.

Black bean and veggie platter

Sauté cauliflower and spinach in low-sodium vegetable broth, seasoned with minced garlic and fresh cilantro. Serve with small scoops of black beans and brown rice, topped with a dollop of guacamole and wedges of fresh lime.

Cynthia Sass is Health’s contributing nutrition editor, a New York Times best-selling author, and consultant for the New York Yankees. See her full bio here. 

 

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Professional Scope of Practice *

The information herein on "Build A Healthy Meal That Actually Keeps You Full" is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional.

Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system.

Our videos, posts, topics, subjects, and insights cover clinical matters, issues, and topics that relate to and support, directly or indirectly, our clinical scope of practice.*

Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We provide copies of supporting research studies available to regulatory boards and the public upon request.

We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

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Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACP, CCST, IFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

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